All posts under Vintage

FSCT Playlist #5 – Rosebud…

Thanks to the celebration of Bernard Herrmann’s 100th birthday, this past week featured a wealth of film music manna. For us fans, few pleasures equal revisiting the works of the giants of film music, whoever they happen to be in your world. Herrmann is one of those in mine. CITIZEN KANE (1941, Bernard Herrmann)—Herrmann’s groundbreaking score brought a new musical voice to Hollywood. It’s not the easiest listen on album but the riches are there to be mined for the patient listener. CARS 2 (2011, Michael Giacchino)—Energetic and fun, and far…

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FSCT Playlist #4 – I Am the Law!

It was yet another slow week of soundtrack listening, which mainly consisted of listening to certain scores over and over again for reviews (hopefully) later on. Thankfully, the week was full of wonderful music, old and new. How about you? LAST TRAIN FROM GUN HILL (1959, Dimitri Tiomkin)—Not top-tier Tiomkin (though a typically memorable main theme), but it always amazes me how well Tiomkin’s Russian sensibilities meshed with those of the American West. THE TREE OF LIFE (2011, Alexandre Desplat)—I don’t think any more needs to be said. TARAS BULBA…

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FSCT Playlist #3 – Klaatu Barada Nikto!

In weeks when I’m editing the latest issue of FSMO, my listening goes way down and tends to focus on the scores we’re featuring in the magazine. Writing to music in the background helps me think creatively. Music on in the background while editing only distracts me and I can’t concentrate properly. So this past week was very light on the film score front. THE DAY THE EARTH STOOD STILL (1951, Bernard Herrmann)—Editing Ross Care’s excellent musical analysis for the latest FSMO had me revisiting this Herrmann classic. SUPER 8 (2011,…

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FSCT Playlist #2 – First Class, My Ass!

Week two of the FSCT Playlist was a bit lightweight in terms of numbers and heavy on Howard Shore for this month’s “9 on the 9th” post. There are certainly worse companions in film music than Shore. The week closed with a celebration of the 30th anniversary of RAIDERS OF THE LOST ARK with a nostalgic tour through the Indiana Jones scores. (Check out Erik Woods’ audio tribute to the franchise at Cinematic Sound.) If you haven’t begun to play yet, start keeping track of the film scores you listen…

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FSCT Playlist #1 – In the Beginning…

As I mentioned last week, I love lists. So beginning this week, I’m instituting a weekly run-through of my playlist. Each Monday or Tuesday I’ll share the film scores I’ve listened to over the past week. The list with consist of: New scores that I need to hear for this site and other projects, taken from the stacks of CDs and downloads sitting on my desk and my desktop And a journey through my entire score collection from A to Z, choosing the first score from each composer, then starting all over…

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Kundun

When Martin Scorcese’s KUNDUN was released on Christmas Day, 1997, its box office prospects were decidedly slim. The film cost $24 million and only took in a paltry $5.6 million, far below the $42 million for CASINO (1995) or even the $16 million for BRINGING OUT THE DEAD (1997). But the story of the fourteenth Dalai Lama—from his founding at age four through his flight to India during the attacks on Tibet by the Chinese during the Cultural Revolution—was going to be a tough sell at any time. With its justly Oscar-nominated…

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Mutiny on the Bounty

Fresh off the success of its widescreen remake of BEN-HUR in 1959, M-G-M greenlit another famous epic—a remake of the studio’s 1935 Best Picture Oscar winner, MUTINY ON THE BOUNTY. The tale of the famous 1789 mutiny aboard the H.M.S. Bounty would seem ripe for a bright, Technicolor touch-up. But as directors and writers came and went, and star Marlon Brando wreaked havoc on the set with his constant demands and his “Method” acting, production costs continued to mount and the film nearly sank the studio. Fans of the classic 1935 film…

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Sleuth

Based on Anthony Shaffer’s Tony Award-winning mystery, SLEUTH stars Laurence Olivier as a popular mystery writer and Michael Caine as the hairdresser who is having an affair with his wife, whose invitation to his country estate turns into a witty and deadly game of one-upmanship. Under Joseph L. Mankiewicz’s assured direction (SLEUTH was his final film), Olivier and Caine ham it up like two the old pros they are. One of the real joys of the film is John Addison‘s buoyant and witty Oscar-nominated score. The brass announce the curtain…

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Silverado

Bruce Broughton‘s rousing music for SILVERADO ranks as one of the finest Western scores ever written. Though Lawrence Kasdan’s film encompasses almost every element in the traditional Hollywood genre, this tale of four unlikely friends (Kevin Kline, Scott Glenn, Kevin Costner, Danny Glover) who right the injustices in the small prairie town of Silverado is not your typical Western. Kasdan said he was making a “Western for people had never seen a Western before.” If only all Westerns were filled with this much humor, beautiful cinematography and fine performances. The film’s…

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Little April Shower

I’m one of the few stoics (or unfeeling bastards, depending on who you ask) who have never, and I mean never, cried at the death of Bambi’s mother. I can shed a tear at milk commercials, but for some reason this primal fear has never moved me. And on a recent viewing of the film, I think I finally figured out why—Bambi’s mother is never given enough screen time for us to grow attached. Even though I’m an animal lover, BAMBI has never been one of my favorite Disney films. Based…

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