All posts under John Addison

Sleuth

Sleuth

Based on Anthony Shaffer’s Tony Award-winning mystery, SLEUTH stars Laurence Olivier as a popular mystery writer and Michael Caine as the hairdresser who is having an affair with his wife, whose invitation to his country estate turns into a witty and deadly game of one-upmanship. Under Joseph L. Mankiewicz’s assured direction (SLEUTH was his final film), Olivier and Caine ham it up like two the old pros they are. One of the real joys of the film is John Addison‘s buoyant and witty Oscar-nominated score. The brass announce the curtain…

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9 Oscar-Nominated Scores That Deserve (Re)discovery

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With the 2010 Academy Awards just weeks away, this month’s “9 on the 9th” post covers some real “lost in the shuffle” Oscar-nominated film scores. With over 75 years worth of scores to choose from, I had to set myself some ground rules. The main rule was no CD’s. Sure, a CD does not necessarily guarantee discovery by general film music fans, but the odds improve significantly. LP releases were eligible. These scores are not necessarily my “favorites” per se, as in other posts, though I heartily recommend them all. Instead,…

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He Was Born To Be Hanged

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Once a bastard, always a bastard? That question lies at the heart of Henry Fielding’s classic TOM JONES. For those who missed out on the Kritzerland reissue of John Addison’s Oscar-winning score, you’ll have to “make due” with Tony Richard’s delightful film instead. (Not such a bad thing, that.) Unless you’ve seen the film, it’s hard to truly appreciate Addison’s score. The delights of TOM JONES are many and it all begins in those opening three minutes. Played like a silent movie farce, complete with dialogue cards and sped-up photography, the prologue…

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CD Review: Tom Jones

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Arguably the least stuffy costumer ever filmed, Albert Finney stars as TOM JONES (1963), Henry Fielding’s classic bastard of ignoble birth. With a countryside estate’s worth of raucous performances–including Susannah York, Hugh Griffith, and Dame Edith Evans–Tony Richardson’s disarming direction and John Osborne’s witty screenplay utilize camera tricks, voiceovers, and asides directly to the audience. The effect is cinematic vaudeville and Oscar gold. The film won four Academy Awards, including Best Picture, as well as statues for Richardson and Osborne. John Addison’s Oscar-winning score, newly released on CD by Kritzerland, provides the…

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